SOCIAL MEDIA NEWSADD NEWS SHARE

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Nice summary on content and Millennials.

To some, millennials are entitled and expect to be given the world; to others, we are a tolerant group that just wants to change the world. But to marketers, millennials are the holy grail of potential consumers: those with nearly an entire lifetime of buying power ahead of them. According to a 2013 Yahoo Content Marketing Ingestion Study, millennials will have $1.4 trillion of spending power in the US by 2020.
Read on

Lucio Ribeiro

Lucios reaction: Great example of turning negative into positive

Have you ever noticed that almost all advertisements for feminine sanitary products portray ecstatically happy women This representation is somewhat inaccurate to how women feel during that ‘time of the month'.
Read on

Irwin Liaw

Irwins reaction: Could this be the most powerful advertising on the internet since search?

Facebook will be launching new features next week that allow advertisers to target their ads to customers based on contact information that the advertiser has already collected. It s a way for businesses to connect their Facebook ads with the customer lists they may have built up elsewhere.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: THoughts on how we measure the latest fad...

Did you detect the sarcasm in that statement Two nights ago at Social Slam in Knoxville, Tennessee, I got asked if Pinterest is the hottest thing since... well, the last hottest thing (let's call it Instagram for argument's sake), then (not even twenty-four hours later), I'm on a flight home, reading USA Today when the top headline for the Money section is: "Pinterest growth curve levels off." So, that's it We've already fallen out of love with Pinterest According to the article in the newspaper: "...meteoric growth for the overnight app sensation slackened, according to two market-research firms. The image-bookmarking site and social network drew 18.7 million unique visitors in the U.S. in March, compared with 17.8 million in February and 11.7 million in January says comScore."
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: We have also updated our Facebook page to Timeline. I have found it actually a little nicer and impactful than the old pages. facebook.com/dministry

Now that Facebook Timeline has finally rolled out for brands, companies have endless opportunities to refresh their social media strategy. Sounds overwhelming, doesn't it Let's break it down.As of Wednesday, brands can opt in on the new features. If you are not familiar them, be sure to review them here before you dive into this project. Some of the prominent changes include a new layout with cover photo, highlighting features and the ability to edit and update without navigating to a separate page. Timeline will automatically go live for all brand pages Mar. 30.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Bit disappointed with the change here of the removal of the Facebook landing page.

Today Facebook announced to brand marketers the world over that, within the month, everything they knew about fan Pages on Facebook would be overturned. While you get your brand ready for the new Timeline format, here are six important changes to keep top-of-mind.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Go on Facebook, you know you want to.

It's time for Facebook to go hat in hand to Apple and make a deal to get integrated into its operating systems, iOS and OS X. The two companies have been in a stand off for a long time. In 2010, Steve Jobs said Facebook's "onerous terms" prevented it from being integrated into iTunes social network Ping. We're not sure if that was Steve Jobs bending the truth to his liking, or if Facebook was really asking for something outrageous.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: public offering would value the company at US$100 billion and make that nice young Mr. Zuckerberg worth some $24 billion - on paper at least.

Would-be investors, gagging to make a quick buck or 10 million and champing at the bit as some sort of a public floatation of part of the social network Facebook gets closer, will have been taken aback by the revelation from company founder, Mark Zuckerberg, Himself, that he has "made a bunch of mistakes" over user privacy.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Interesting look at eye tracking on social media profiles

When potential dates, employers and friends glance at your online social profiles, what do they see EyeTrackShop, a startup that runs eye-tracking studies for advertisers, helped Mashable find out by applying its technology to the profile pages of popular social networks. The study used the webcams of 30 participants to record their eye movements as they were shown profile pages from Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Flickr, YouTube, Klout, Reddit, Digg, Tumblr, Twitter, StumbleUpon and Pinterest at 10-second intervals. What participants looked at on each page and in what order is recorded in the images below.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Seems to be a lot of chinks starting to appear in Facebook's armour. Gaps are starting to appear for savvy companies.

Facebook recently instituted a new program that makes it easy for 3rd party websites and services to automatically post links about your activity elsewhere back into Facebook and the newsfeeds of your friends. It's called Seamless Sharing (a.k.a. frictionless sharing) and there's a big backlash growing about it, reminiscent of the best-known time Facebook tried to do something like this with a program called Beacon. The company has done things like this time and time again.Critics say that Seamless Sharing is causing over-sharing, violations of privacy, self-censorship with regard to what people read, dilution of value in the Facebook experience and more. CNet's Molly Wood says it is ruining sharing. I think there's something more fundamental going on than this - I think this is a violation of the relationship between the web and its users. Facebook is acting like malware.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: It looks like he may be right. I still think a product model works and they should stick to what they are good at. Especially with all the new cleaner designs, they would be better off just leaving Google+ as a glorified Google User Profile.

Last night, Google engineer, blogger, and frequent public speaker Steve Yegge wrote an epic rant about Google's inept handling of the Google+ platform. His primary message: Google+ is not a platform like Facebook. It's trying to dictate the direction of Google+ instead of opening up to developers and letting them show Google what makes sense and what doesn't. He posted the rant on Google+, but forgot to turn off the "Public" sharing option. It was only meant to be shared internally at Google.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Sobering thoughts

When you own a domain you're a first class citizen of the web. A householder and landowner. What you can do on your own website is only very broadly constrained by law and convention. You can post the content you like. You can run the software you want, including software you've written or customised yourself. And you can design it to look the way you want. If you're paying for a web hosting service and you don't like it (or they don't like you) you can pack up your site and move it to another host. Your URLs will stay the same and so your visitors won't notice. You get a great deal of freedom in return for the cost of running your own site. Your site could still be there in a decade's time, possibly even in a century.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Facebook is on an update rampage at the moment, I have head a lot of complaining about this in my FB news feed, from the feedback here it looks like some of this has been rushed.

It's been over 72 hours since Facebook first debuted a series of groundbreaking new features at f8, which is all the time I need to predict the company's long-term outlook, the way it will reinvent the web, and the pricing of its inevitable IPO. Okay, maybe not. But it's given me some time to try the features out, as opposed to basing my impressions off of Facebook's well-crafted keynote presentations. And while many of these obviously have a lot of potential, in practice I'm finding them to be a mixed (or, in some cases, a downright irritating) bag.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Interesting new trend from TechCrunch Disrupt

There's a new concept for social networking services taking root, and it's not about re-creating your offline social graph on the Web, like Facebook does today. It's about discovering the people who are nearby you now - the ones you probably would like to meet. This type of discovery mechanism is already being made possible by a number of services, including the checkin apps like Foursquare and Gowalla, the automated discovery of nearby folks via Sonar and Banjo, the group chatting in Yobongo, and the micro-networks that emerge through LoKast. All of these companies are playing with the idea of location-based social networks, attempting to connect you to others around you through varying means.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: An obvious response to Google+ Circles?

Facebook today officially launches several improvements to its Friend Lists feature that can be used to define privacy settings and filter the news feed, including some changes that leaked last week. As we covered in depth then, users now have automatically created, populated and updated Smart Lists of their family, co-workers, classmates, and local friends. Additionally, users can now add friends to an 'Acquaintances' list whose members will appear less frequently in the news feed, and a 'Close Friends' list of people who will appear more frequently in news feed and whose updates will trigger notifications.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Maybe a prelude to The Social Network Part II?

Remember, remember the fifth of November, the day Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the English Parliament in 1605 and the day Anonymous threatens to destroy Facebook. Update: Is this a fake? A splinter group? A video press release reportedly from the hacker group claims it will launch an all-out assault that will bring down the social network. Anonymous has singled out Facebook for its shady privacy settings and its policy that makes it difficult for users to delete their account.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: I think Google has done the right thing here and started with the bones and will let users decide where to take the feature set. As opposed to doing what they did with Wave and build something without finding out if it was what people wanted. Maybe the big G has finally dropped the 'We know best' attitude finally.

For the past few days I've been hanging out in Jackson Hole with a bunch of geeks and one thing I've noticed over and over is how boring Twitter has gotten when compared to Google+. Why has Twitter turned boring?
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: More fluff or serious contender, too many non-decriptive product names for my liking.

After months of waiting, Google finally unveiled on Tuesday its new social project, Google+. It s an ambitious gambit that aims to turn all of Google s services into one giant social platform, and in the process steal some thunder from Facebook while making Google for once a big player in social networking. Google has redesigned the top navigation bar to work across all of its services. It s very similar to the notification bar found in Facebook, which alerts users about new activity concerning their accounts.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: This is why these types of tech companies are so overvalued, they can go the way of MySpace and be dead at the whim of the generation that created them.

Everybody loves to get behind the hot young start up and embrace it as if it is the greatest thing in the world since sliced bread. Turntable.fm and Instagram are the latest examples with people in-the-know shouting and screaming from the rooftops about how amazing they are. When you see something special for the first time you just get that feeling in your stomach that you are in at the ground level and you are bursting with excitement waiting for the rest of the world to find out. People used to have that same feeling with Twitter and before that with Facebook. For a couple of years the online geeky community (I don't say geeky in a negative way because I was one) knew about Twitter, understood its power and every piece of news coverage or mainstream attention was cheered as if we all owned shares in the company. Facebook was exclusive at the start too. Only my young cool in the know friends were on it for a couple of years.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Some good insights here on tweaking game mechanics to take your Facebook promotion viral.

After six months of testing different gamification and viral mechanics, professional social networking Facebook app BranchOut seems to have found the right design. It grew its monthly active user count from 32,897 to 817,367 in a week, according to our AppData tracking service, with its daily active user count following behind, at 163,578 today. Growth exploded as soon as the company pulled its arguably spammy question battles feature from its home page and replaced it with relevant job listings. The unusually big spurt for a professional networking app, which the company says has come without any marketing growth, indicates that Facebook users want professional social networking. They just apparently hadn t been given a tool that met their needs. This bodes well for other Facebook recruiting tools including Identified and Work4 Labs.
Read on




 

TOP SHARERS


Write for Digital Ministry. Demonstrate your expertise, raise your profile, get exposure for your company brand.

BECOME A DIGITAL MINISTRY CHAMPION

 

LATEST DIRECTORY LISTINGS Boost SEO - add your company for free

Digital Reseller New Zeland | resell seo services new zealandReef Electric BikesWebsite design SydneyLarissa RembiszSmall business web designSearchMinistryElsner Technologies Pvt LtdTop SEO AdelaideAustralian Conservation Foundation