MOBILE MARKETING NEWSADD NEWS SHARE

Kelly  Slessor

Kelly s reaction: A mobile tsunami is coming. This is a great insight to the future of mobile, from a handset, operating system and content perspective.

Draw something app launched 6 weeks ago. It' the number 1 app in 79 countries and has 20+ million users - it generates a $100k revenue a day. It took AOL 9 years to reach 1 million users, facebook 9 months and Draw something 9 days.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Nice work!

The University of Sydney has a great bunch of interaction design students and one of them is Stephen Davis. As you all know Amnesia Razorfish is always trying to stay ahead of the curve especially when it comes to new technologies so when Stephen had the idea of the BrandTable we were able to help him out a little.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Blackberry has issues, now Apple, Is over-demand in the mobile spectrum creating a problem now?

The Internet is humming with the dread noise of thwarted iPhone users as Apple's iOS 5 launch hits teething problems. Are these silly slip-ups or a symptom of that classic business problem: how to get big but stay agile? By Ian Scales. Apple is on the Blackberry naughty step today as users who downloaded its latest OS offering, iOS 5 for the iphone, iPad and iPod, experienced a range of difficulties. For the most part, the problem seems to have been simple over-demand. Many iPhone owners (apparently) have decided not to upgrade to the iPhone 4S, preferring to wait instead for the iPhone 5. As a consolation they've decided the new iOS version 5 will give them something to get excited about until the '5' makes its appearance. So they all downloaded at once and, since the download is a very large multi-megabyte effort, that demand has clogged the app delivery system and has caused some of downloads to stop and then for the phone to fail, caught in no-phone's land between a displaced old system and a not-quite-fully loaded new one.
Read on

Cameron Wall

Camerons reaction: I am sure it will be Mobile "only" one day

The reality is that mobile is no longer about the phone, it s about being connected. Many predict that mobile Internet traffic will soon surpass that of traditional wired broadband. For enterprise brands and agencies, this trend is proving to be a disruptive force that is completely changing the way that marketing and advertising campaigns are being developed. Here are the five reasons that every brand needs to think mobile first.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: They are also starting to say they aren't a Social Media company but a platform. Interesting tactics.

Facebook has their sights locked on mobile. We know that. This afternoon at GigaOm's Mobilize conference, Facebook Mobile Chief Erick Tseng touched on just how crucial mobile is to them - and more importantly, how crucial it will be. Just how crucial are we talking about? Within 1-2 years, Tseng sees Facebook becoming as much of a mobile company as it is a desktop/web company.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Hardly surprising, these days I feel somewhat uncomfortable if I forget to charge my iPhone in the morning and have to spend my public transport time with my own thoughts. And the thought of being without now is just not contemptible. Sad...I know.

Survey results are always worth taking with several large grains of salt, but Google's local research into the smartphone habits reveal some interesting trends in Australian smartphone usage, including whether we'd rather give up our tellies or our smartphones.Google's research polled 30,000 people worldwide, including Australia, although it's not clear how many locals exactly were queried. Being Google, the results are largely very advertising-centric.
Read on

Mike Boyd

Mikes reaction: Not quite the article I was expecting,but an interesting perspective nonetheless. The MSFT-NOKIA tie up should be be overlooked - nor the potential for RIM devices to run Android apps. Interesting times ahead.

It has become impossible to escape the smartphone wars. Every day there is another infographic about the race for dominance between Android and iPhone. It has the feel of a political campaign, with the two major parties duking it out for 2012. Is there room for a third party? Is the Nokia-Microsoft team a political also ran?
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: It all begins here. The future of payments will begin here soon. The data and marketing infrastructure that should be build off the back of this has vast potential.

It s no secret that credit card companies are shelling out big bucks and aggressively forming partnerships and deals to start cashing in on the mobile and digital payments innovations currently taking place. American Express, which recently debuted its own digital payments product Serve, has been particularly aggressive on the partnerships front, striking recent deals with both Foursquare and Facebook. Mastercard has bet on NFC with a partnership with Google for Google Wallet and bought online payments gateway DataCash for $520 million last fall. And Visa has made a number of major moves in the mobile and digital payments space of late; including making an investment (and taking on an advisory role) in disruptive startup Square, buying virtual goods payments platform PlaySpan for $190 million, and acquiring mobile payments company Fundamo for $110 million. We sat down with Visa s Global Head of Mobile Product Bill Gadja and the company s Head of Global Product Strategy, Innovation and eCommerce Jennifer Schulz to discuss how the financial company is planning to compete in both mobile and digital payments.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: I am not sure why manufacturers insist on making so many variants. Just make the best one you can make in a category. Surely Apple has proven that now.

July saw many of the world's major smartphone manufacturers post their second quarter financial results, documenting how they had faired in an increasingly competitive and consistently growing market. Apple and Samsung posted highly encouraging handset sales, grabbing first and second positions as the world's top smartphone vendors in terms of sales. HTC posted another record quarter but Nokia didn't have such a good time of it, with smartphone sales falling 32% year on year to place the company as the third biggest smartphone maker by volume, having previously enjoyed top position.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Google starting to throw the toys out of the pram by the sounds of it :)

Google just doesn't let up. The search giant fired a shot at Microsoft for the second time in two days over Android patent lawsuits after Microsoft responded last night with a series of tweets. In a heated blog post yesterday, Google Chief Legal Officer David Drummond took aim at companies like Microsoft, Apple, and Oracle over many 'bogus'patent lawsuits that had recently targeted the Android OS and its manufacturing partners. In response, Microsoft's general counsel Brad Smith tweeted last night: 'Google says we bought Novell patents to keep them from Google. Really? We asked them to bid jointly with us. They said no'
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Latest mobile stats from PWC

Based on the latest projections from PricewaterhouseCoopers, tablets and smartphones will continue to drive digital newspapers, magazines, and mobile TV adoption and ad revenue to staggering new heights by 2015. Tablets are poised to help U.S. newspapers increase paid digital circulation to 4.6 million in 2015, for example, with most of the growth coming at general interest newspapers, from 1.5 million last year, primarily at the Wall Street Journal, according to annual Global Entertainment and Media Outlook from PricewaterhouseCoopers, which was released today.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: More speed! Other carriers are getting left behind.

Telstra Corporation Ltd (ASX:TLS) says it has become the first Australian telco to extended its wireless network to include 4G technology. The company's first 4G base stations have been switched on at stations in Sydney, Perth Melbourne and Brisbane using Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: That old privacy thing just wont go away.

Technology giants Sony, Apple and Google have all faced major scandals in recent weeks that raise a host of questions about privacy in the digital age. Apple's popular iPhone was designed to secretly track a user s location without the user s knowledge, and so was Google's Android system for smartphones. Sony's PlayStation Network has exposed the personal records of more than 100 million of its customers. We speak to Mark Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, who notes that in addition to privacy breaches, these private companies are essentially doing a better job with popular surveillance than the government, creating a detailed personal record that then can be released by a subpoena. [includes rush transcript]
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Oh dear, more wasted cash. With so many talented user experience designers around how is it possible that big companies can continue to release FAILs like this?

RIM's PlayBook tablet has bombed with influential technology reviewers who call the new iPad competitor a rushed job that won't even provide RIM's vaunted email service unless it's hooked up to a BlackBerry."RIM has just shipped a BlackBerry product that cannot do email. It must be skating season in hell," New York Times' David Pogue wrote in a review published yesterday.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Mobile internet has reached the tipping point where data is affordable and speeds are there. Now what to do with it?!

Do you seriously want to become rich? Here's the secret - and it's got nothing to do with building an online social network, or even getting the government to bail out your bank. To paraphrase Mr. McGuire from The Graduate, I want to say one word to you. Just one word. Mobile. Like, duh, yeah, you knew that mobile phones were the next big thing, what, a dozen years ago? And in between playing Angry Birds and tweeting from the Apple Store, you didn t need reminding that apps were going to make us all millionaires.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: More evidence that with the right offers and compliance standards, SMS becomes the key to a successful mobile marketing campaign.

UK-based mobile operator O2 is seeing huge success with its 'O2 More'; SMS advertising service, announcing that it now has over 2 million actively engaged subscribers and over 1,000 advertisers. Launched just 16 months ago with roughly 50 brands, O2 has found a winning strategy by adhering to strict user-privacy rules and maintaining high relevance with the messages it sends. First off, the service only sends one SMS message per day, and the user explicitly details what kind of products and services they re interested in upon sign up. In addition, every single SMS contains an opt-out capability, so the customer can cancel O2 More at any time.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: US based but interesting.

Amazon is letting consumers compare in-store prices with those from Amazon.com and other online merchants via an iPhone application that poses a threat to store retailers. The Price Check application lets consumers search across different categories including toys and consumer electronics. Customers can scan a bar code, snap a picture or say or type a product name to receive instant prices for that particular item.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: I doubt it, but there maybe some serious updates to Places. It needs some kind of angle to be more than a novelty.

A fresh invitation just hit our inbox which says Facebook will hold a "mobile event"; next week. Will this be the introduction of the much-rumored Facebook phone. As you may recall, TechCrunch broke the news that the company was working on its own phone based on Android. The goal of the Facebook phone is to make a mobile phone that's built from the ground up with social in mind. Your social networking friends would be your address book and so on.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: This would be huge for targeted mobile marketing using SMS. Although as it effectively reduces SMS volumes I can't see all major carriers investing money into it. Be interesting to see how it utilises real-time GPS data to trigger delivery.

O2 announced that it is the first network provider to offer large-scale location-based mobile marketing service in the UK. As a result, brands are able to deliver relevant SMS and MMS to consumers in a more targeted and effective way than ever before. Consumers on their end opt into the service to receive relevant messages dependent on their age, gender, interests and their current location. Among the first companies to jump on board are Starbucks and Loreal. The former will offer money off Starbucks VIA Ready Brew at a nearby branch, while the latter runs buy one get one free campaign on Loreal Elvive hair care products at Superdrug.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Is it possible, has Apple become the evil Goliath and Microsoft the lovable underdog?

While there is broad consensus that Microsoft has actually delivered a decent phone OS with Windows Phone 7, pundits are universally panning Windows Phone 7 s future due to the market traction of iPhone and Android, Palm s HP reset for WebOS, and the reawakening of Nokia and RIM. Mobile is clearly a huge trend that is displacing desktop computing, and people so soon forget that when Microsoft feels its turf is threatened, it is a fierce competitor.
Read on




 

TOP SHARERS


Write for Digital Ministry. Demonstrate your expertise, raise your profile, get exposure for your company brand.

BECOME A DIGITAL MINISTRY CHAMPION

 

LATEST DIRECTORY LISTINGS Boost SEO - add your company for free

The HCG Diet | hcg drops australiaSales Training AdelaideBook Keeping ChampsOnline MonkeysDean Infotech Pvt LtdC&C MarkarketingRon Dean WillcocksIntellect TechnologiesDataSauce