TECHNOLOGY NEWSADD NEWS SHARE

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Love this, the power of 1-2-1 advertising

Recently I found myself in need of a room mate and, like many others, reached out to the Craigslist universe. Looking back at the post titled 'Super Awesome Room mate Needed', it included more details about the extroverted and energetic room mate (me) than it did about the actual place they would be renting. I had a few takers, but no one that I was interested to live with.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Just when you though you could use that image....

Copyright law is a legal minefield. A lawyer explains how to navigate the treacherous waters of fair use so you don't end up in court. We've even created this handy guide.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Zuckerburg is definitely killing Gutenberg

Newsweek, the weekly magazine that for decades summarized the news for households across the United States but struggled to maintain relevance in the Internet era, announced on Thursday that it would cease print publication at the end of the year.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: The app market is getting crowded.

Preempting what will almost certainly see the launch of the company's Kindle Fire tablet range in Europe, Amazon has pushed live its Android Appstore in the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: LInkedIn and facebook merge?

LinkedIn is rolling out a major refresh to its homepage starting today, the company announced on its blog. The new look removes a lot of the clutter from your home screen, focusing on the network updates and news that you'll likely care about the most. Instead of a flood of updates from all of your contacts, LinkedIn will determine the ones that matter the most to you. Articles from LinkedIn Today, the company's news aggregation product, will be displayed more prominently too.
Read on

Irwin Liaw

Irwins reaction: The price point for the stock was too aggressive. I think they have issued too many shares out. By doing so, they caused several consequences starting with an inflated stock price that made it difficult for professional fund managers to invest. There are long-term issues as well like, difficulties deriving revenue from its new users overseas, and from its growing presence on mobile devices. The business model is not fully backed. Certainly it doesnt scale yet to the numbers they need to justify a $100 billion valuation.

WASHINGTON (June 4, 2012): Two weeks after the largest, most anticipated IPO in years, Facebook shares keep going down. And down. And down. And investors want to know how far they can go.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Love this idea as they are Iconic and 5 years from being pulled down but also its a top idea. You can then make your skype call anywhere?

London's red telephone boxes are iconic, sure, but just how relevant can they be in this century Spectrum Interactive has a solution that both ensures their preservation and provides customers in search of internet a free ticket online. The company has converted some 1,800 pay phones throughout London into WiFi hotspots, offering passersby a free connection so long as they provide their mobile numbers and download an e-coupon for a nearby store. Spectrum initially began testing the program with the help of Nokia late last year, and while it's amassed an impressive number of WiFi access points, it's lost the support of its Finnish partner, and is still assessing how willing local businesses are to pay for getting coupons in the service. On top of that, there's the whole issue of how many people will think to scope out phone booths rather than, say, an internet cafe. Here's hoping Spectrum has some very flashy signs on the windows.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Been looking forward to this one and loving it mostly. The +1 integration is a bit funky, especially on mobile.

Google has begun rolling out a new version of Google Reader, one that sports a brand-new design and deep integration with Google+. The new Google Reader sports a more spartan interface. It s similar to the Google Calendar redesign and Gmail makeover the search giant launched earlier this year. The greater change is the addition of Google+ sharing. Google has replaced the Like button with the +1 button, which lets users share content to their Google+ accounts. Reader users with a Google+ login can choose which circles they d like to share articles to using Google+ snippets.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: You can start to see how Google is coming at the whole social media issue, they get developers, businesses, search and publishers onside and they basically crowbar users onto the platform. Will this strategy work? It will be really interesting to see what they do with their business pages.

It has begun. Google released the first of its application programming interfaces (API) for its social network Google+ today, according to a Google blog post. The API focuses only on publicly available data the information users have purposefully included on their public Google+ pages. Developers can access users profiles and latest posts. Google is also providing code libraries for those who code in a different language such as Java, Python, Ruby or PHP. Developers can find more information about Google+ APIs on the company s new dedicated site and the Google Developers site.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Interesting points from key industry people. Mobile is all, and spectrum may be an issue oif there is not a mass production of small bay stations.

Looking back on the last ten years of telecoms was easy deciding to look ahead at the next ten years was a little more difficult, and fraught with the potential for massive future embarrassment. Still, the TelecomTV editors were undeterred, and bravely took up the challenge of a special edition of the Main Agenda to mark our tenth anniversary. Martyn Warwick, Guy Daniels and Ian Scales put their reputations on the line and attempt to predict the future
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: It's early days yet but although there are some drawbacks there are a lot of positives as well. There are a lot of great libraries turning up for HTML5 for example.

HTML5 heralds some nifty new features and the potential for sparking a Web programming paradigm shift, and as everyone who has read the tech press knows, there is nothing like HTML5 for fixing the Internet. Sprinkle some HTML5 into your code, and your websites will be faster and fancier -- it'll make your teeth white, too. But the reality of what HTML5 can do for those seeking native-app performance on the Web falls short of the hype.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: This is the kind of thing Google should be working on instead of wasting resources on their social media efforts. This could be really innovative if they get it right.

In a blog post, Google software engineer James Hawkins revealed that the company is working on a system called Web Intents in which it will enable Chrome users to pipe data between different Web applications much the same way Android users can share data between apps. The idea is to create one API that various Web applications can all use to pass data back and forth without a need for each one to be designed to work with the other apps.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Not surprising really. IE9 has caused a lot of issues with existing sites, I think that website owners will be getting sick of having to retest and re-deploy code every time Microsoft updates their software. Doesn't seem to be too much of a problem for the rest.

It is the first day of the month, and that means new browser market share numbers from Net Applications. Internet Explorer and Firefox continue to slide as Chrome and Safari gain ground -- but Microsoft focuses on its own silver lining. The bottom line is that Chrome and Safari have been steadily rising, while Internet Explorer and Firefox have been steadily falling. Given the relatively small differences month to month, it will still take years before Chrome passes Safari -- never mind catching up to IE, but the trend is what it is.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: One massive step for speech recognition technology ?

The notion of asking a computer for information out loud is familiar to most of us only from science fiction. Google is trying to change that by adding speech recognition to its search engine, and releasing technology that would allow any browser, website, or app to use the feature. But are you ready to give up your keyboards and talk to Google instead? Over the last two weeks, speech input for Google has gradually been rolled out to every person using Google's Chrome browser. A microphone icon appears at the right end of the iconic search box. If you have a microphone built-in or attached to your computer, clicking that icon creates a direct audio connection to Google's servers, which will convert your spoken words into text. It has been possible to speak Google search queries using a smart phone for almost three years; since last year, Android handsets have been able to take voice input in any situation where a keyboard would normally be used. "That was transformational, because people stopped worrying about when they could and couldn't speak to the phone," says Vincent Vanhoucke, who leads the voice search engineering team at Google. Over the last 12 months, the number of spoken inputs, search or otherwise, via Android devices has climbed six times, and every day, tens of thousands of hours of audio speech are fed into Google's servers. "On Android, a large fraction of the use is people dictating e-mail and SMS," says Vanhoucke.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Always with the embedded chip, but will it happen?

Ray Hammond is the futurologist who first coined the term "online" back in 1983. In the video below, he discusses his predictions for the future, his advice for marketers and why he's not going mad when he says we'll all have voices in our heads by 2040.
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: Apple are betting that processing will stay with the device, Google have their bets on the browser.

Apple and Google now dominate the world's smartphone and mobile device markets and both are now pushing quickly into the cloud. While Apple this week finally acknowledged the cloud as the future of computing - and will finally allow iPads and iPhones to be set up and backed up without being tethered to a computer running iTunes - many Google fans accurately note that Apple's iCloud doesn't bring a lot of new features to the table. The truth is that Apple seems a little late in endorsing the cloud as the new center of our digital world. After all, cloud computing has played a growing role in the tech industry for years.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Are Microsoft and Bing about to leap Google?

Starting tomorrow, recommendations from your Facebook friends will become a regular part of Web search results, at least if you use Microsoft's Bing search engine. A slew of new Bing features will use Facebook data to make its results more personalized, and to create opportunities to discuss what you are searching for with friends. Bing will let users ask their Facebook friends for shopping advice through its search results. "All the stuff we've deployed previously for Web search doesn't acknowledge the human, social side of our users," says Stefan Weitz, director of Bing search. "We were looking at it like engineers, and built a purely logic-based experience," Weitz says. Web search should support people's instincts to consult and discuss things with other people. A survey of Bing users found that 90 percent would talk with a friend before they acted on any information they found when searching online for product information, he says.
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Things will always get smaller and lighter so phones as thin as paper was somewhat inevitably going to happen. Give it a few years and it will be as mass produced and as disposable as real paper.

A prototype flexible smartphone made of electronic paper has been created by Canadian researchers. The PaperPhone can do all the things bulkier smartphones can do such as make and take calls, send messages, play music or display e-books. The gadget triggers different functions and features when bent, folded and flexed at its corners or sides. "Everything is going to look and feel like this within five years," said creator Dr Roel Vertegaal. The device emerged from a collaboration between researchers at the Human Media Lab at Queen's University, Canada and Arizona State University's Motivational Environments Research group. "This computer looks, feels and operates like a small sheet of interactive paper," said Dr Vertegaal in a statement. "You interact with it by bending it into a cell phone, flipping the corner to turn pages, or writing on it with a pen."
Read on

Brad Down

Brads reaction: As a small business owner I understand the importance of cashflow. Its about time that software companies understood this. The pricing is marginal, if they really want to nip piracy in the bud, reduce it by another 30% and watch the dollars flow.

49 notes seems pretty pricey to me, but then it's a lot more palatable than coughing up $US650 for the full-flavour package. It could be handy if you had a month's work ahead of you, or always want the latest version. Adobe Subscription Editions has just launched now, for all your favourite pieces of software including InDesign and Dreamweaver. [Macworld]
Read on

John Lynch

Johns reaction: Must have spent a motza but looks great

When it comes to 3D mapping projection - It is still always all about creativity, not the tools. An emotional connection with the brand is essential regardless of the medium.
Read on




 

TOP SHARERS


Write for Digital Ministry. Demonstrate your expertise, raise your profile, get exposure for your company brand.

BECOME A DIGITAL MINISTRY CHAMPION

 

LATEST DIRECTORY LISTINGS Boost SEO - add your company for free

Best Bet FranchiseColour Life Professional Strata Painters SydneyFuGenX Technologies LtdFuGenX TechnologiesNTC Voice SolutionsGlorywebsSparro Digital Marketing AgencyData ScoutsYakPortal