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John Lynch

Johns reaction: Interesting that Ryanair could be so bad

When it comes to website usability, from search results to the booking process, Booking.com topped the list and Ryanair came in last among 51 UK websites analyzed by eDigitalResearch.
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Brad Down

Brads reaction: Will be keeping an eye on this with interest.

No, the title is not a joke. Microsoft's open-source CMS platform, called Orchard, did hit its first full number release today, meaning that if you are in the market for a CMS there is one more option that you need to check out. In case you are unfamiliar with Orchard, Microsoft first showed off the platform in November of 2009. The company then transferred (gave) the project to the CodePlex Foundation the next month, with a promise of three years support. The team at Microsoft that had been working on the project were gifted along with the software.
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Brad Down

Brads reaction: With all the argument over Flash v HTML5 for video delivery. What about other aspects of what Flash does? With the difficulties of developing apps in HTML5 maybe its time for Adobe to stop whining, take advantage of the opportunity and build a version of Flash that outputs HTML5?

Item: I got mail from really well-known Web technologist his competence is not in doubt making his first foray into mobile development. He wrote: I m trying to avoid appstore hell by developing rich HTML5 apps, but the performance on iPhone is shoddy whenever network IO is going on, and I seem to be able to crash the browser on our departmental Nexus One with such frequency it's not even funny. I think I've got a lot of optimization to do to my app to dial down network access, but I just wondered what the jungle drums say about HTML5 as a sensible approach for delivering apps in 2010.
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James Grant Hay

The battle for viewers is set to heat up as portals and publishers compete for the increasingly fragmented TV audience through Internet TV.
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Brad Down

GOOGLE has finally removed the beta tag from a slew of applications, including Gmail and Docs, in a bid to woo large corporate clients. The Premier version is the paid service for Google's online application suite for communication, productivity and collaboration -- areas where Microsoft traditionally dominates with its Office and Outlook products, and where IBM has a legacy foothold with Lotus Notes.
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Brad Down

Earlier this month, Flickr started flirting with Twitter integration by allowing users to link their Flickr accounts to their Twitter accounts. The experiment was only for email uploads, which simultaneously created a Tweet with a short http://flic.kr link back to the photo on Flickr. Now that integration is an official feature called Flickr2Twitter
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Brad Down

There used to be a time when a new Firefox release was an exciting day for early adopters. We'd delve into the new features, rejoice in the speed improvements, and moan about our lost extensions. Today should be another action packed upgrade day - it's reported that Mozilla will release Firefox 3.5 later today (update: it's here now) - but, this time, something is missing.
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Brad Down

TechCrunch reports that YouTube is adding a new ad type to its ad mix named 'Call-To-Action Overlay' ads. These ads are very simple, they basically allow you to add a link to a third-party site, off of YouTube. The ad is a transparent background with an ad description and link to any site you want. I can see the ad live on this video and here is a picture:
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Brad Down

When Google Wave made its public debut last week, it created quite a stir, but without being able to get a hands-on look at the product, it was quite hard to really grasp the implications of what Google was trying to do. Today, we got access to Wave, and after testing it for a while, we can confidently say that Google is indeed on to something. The developer sandbox version we have access to is still a bit rough around the edges, and quite a few functions are still unavailable.
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Brad Down

It's going to be very hard to explain the differences between Web 3.0 and Web 2.0 to a marketing director when these differences don't actually exist - many of these guys are already feeling overwhelmed by the speed at which this sector/ space is growing.
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Brad Down

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--Aza Raskin, head of user experience for Mozilla Labs could be considered the Doogie Howser of the Web design world. At the age of 24, he's heading up some of Mozilla's most experimental projects like Ubiquity, Weave and the concept series. This was after Raskin--the son of the late Apple Macintosh designer Jef Raskin--discontinued his pursuit of a Ph.D. to found Humanized, the company that brought him to Mozilla.
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Brad Down

Is YouTube a $500 million a year business Jefferies analyst Youssef Squali says it is, according to a nugget buried in the Wall Street Journal's look at Google after Tim Armstrong: YouTube, for example, will account for only roughly 3% of Google's net revenue this year, or $500 million, estimated Youssef Squali, an analyst at Jefferies & Co.
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Brad Down

In a heated bidding war, ToysRUs bought the domain name Toys.com at auction for $5.1 million. ToysRus really wanted the domain, for obvious reasons. Everyone except ToysRUs and domain holding company National A-1 (owner of domains such as free.com, boys.com, girls.com, and divorce.com) bowed out of the auction at $3 million. The last $2 million was just those two companies going back and forth for hours.
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Brad Down

Like a gopher in the garden, the notion of newspapers charging for content online keeps popping its nose up out of the dirt. Pardon me while I whack this pesky rodent in the skull. Mind you, I'm all for charging for content if you can. The Financial Times and Wall Street Journal - always cited in this discussion - manage to charge their readers (well, their readers' employers). And we pay for movies, some TV, and now music. But online news is different. First, as soon as knowledge is known, it's a commodity - and not a scarce one that can be controlled. Second, there is no end of competition online. More important, it costs money in marketing to acquire purchasers or subscribers (a magazine in the subscription-heavy US market may spend $40 ( 30) to get $12 in circulation revenue; profitability comes from advertising - or it used to). Charging for content reduces audience, which in turn reduces advertising revenue. And putting a wall around content keeps it out of the conversation and devalues brands (this is why New York Times columnists were said to hate their paper's aborted effort to charge).
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Brad Down

Brads reaction: via @spellrus

For the most part, we never notice the 'visual weight' of a site. That's a good thing. Experienced front-end developers optimize their site to load quickly and display accurately across all modern browsers. In this post, I will detail how to analyze the bottlenecks preventing websites and blogs from loading quickly and how to resolve them.
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Brad Down

Any way you look at it, Google is a powerhouse. It's the world's best search engine -- simple, fast and relevant. In YouTube it also owns the site that originates the second-most search queries. Its market share increased again in 2008, and it has so badly outflanked its largest competitor that Yahoo's highest hope for securing its future revenue was to have Google sell its ad space. Google is a company that is built to last, branching and pruning its business with a never-ending series of beta tests that allow it to grow and constantly evolve.
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Brad Down

If you thought Google was content on keeping to its core business of search, youre going to get a shock its now on the verge of breaking into the world of online storage. The global leader of search engines is about to launch Gdrive, a free service allowing users to store the entire contents of their hard drives on the internet.
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Brad Down

Wikipedia faces a revolt among thousands of its contributors over proposals to change the way the online encyclopedia is run. Until now, Wikipedia has allowed anybody to make instant changes to almost all of its 2.7m entries, with only a handful of entries protected from being altered. But under proposals put forward by the website's co-founder Jimmy Wales, many future changes to the site would need to be approved by a group of editors before going live.
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Brad Down

Even eBay has now admitted that its $2.6bn purchase of Skype in 2005 was too much. With still no logical integration between the telephony service and the auction site, speculation over a potential sale is again intensifying.
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Brad Down

It s 2009. Storage is so cheap that Email providers like Yahoo are literally giving you as much space as you want. Yet we still have to deal with archaic policies that allow these Email providers to delete everything in our inboxes if, for whatever reason, we forget to login for a few months.
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